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Wednesday, November 7, 2012


Keeping little ones occupied is sometime difficult? As we move toward the Christmas period, and attention spans are wavering, many parent may turn to "the box" to keep children busy, occupied and QUIET!

So I researched the topic and founds some interesting tips and stats...

Most child development experts recommend limiting children’s daily "screen time" no more than two hours a day for children over five. Screen time includes TV, DVD and computer time.
This is for the following reasons:
  • The time children spend watching TV should be balanced with activities that are good for their development. These include active play, creative play (such as solving puzzles and drawing), sport and conversation with family and friends.
  • Children can become too reliant on TV for ‘something to do’.
  • Even having a TV on in the background affects children’s concentration.
A good balance of developmental activities with homework, sport and music should leave little time for TV.

For younger children....

Many young children will have some exposure to TV. That’s OK – but it’s also a good idea to put some thought into how your child interacts with the TV.
Programs that are classified ‘C’ are made specially for your child’s age group. You can check out programs before you let your child watch them, and encourage your child to choose and watch only a few favourites. You might also buy some suitable DVDs. 
When you watch TV with your child, you can explain what’s happening and respond to your child’s reactions. You can also point out when characters behave in good and not-so-good ways. Watching together might even give you ideas for other activities.
  • When you’re choosing TV or DVD programs for your school-age child, it’s a good idea to avoid the following:
  • scary images. School-age children are getting better at processing scary or sad images, but they might still be upset by movies or programs showing the death of a parent or threats to children and animals
  • violent content. Children in this age group might imitate violent behaviour if they see their TV heroes using violence to get what they want. This is true for cartoons and live-action shows
  • TV news. Children at school are old enough to understand that things on the news are real. Reports of natural disasters and violent crimes, especially in familiar settings, can make them feel unsafe. Some parents prefer to record the news and watch it later, or watch a late bulletin
  • advertising. School-age children are likely to believe the things ads tell them and will want to buy the products they see. Children are especially vulnerable to ads that tell them certain products will help them be popular and successful. 
  •  visit http://raisingchildren.net.au  (reference of this information).
So, everything  moderation is the key. Keep children busy with sport,  plays at the park and imaginary play at home. And remember to make them a part of the Christmas "action", give them a job or a role, keep them  thinking and busy.....
Through many years of experience during the months of November and December, I would have to say the best way to keep children QUIET, is to tire them out with mental engagement  fresh air, exercise and FUN, so they slumber soundly! 





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